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Top-Notch Showcase Projects

Check out our showcase projects. You can create an entertainment space that showcases your style. Call Cocalico 
Builders Ltd at 717-336-7551 to get started on your project! Don't hesitate to tell us your ideas. Our mission is to turn your vision into reality. (All materials here republished with permission from Lancaster County Magazine)

Recycling The Past

The story begins in 1732 when Peter Bruegger (Bricker) and Margaretha Roesti emigrated from Bern, Switzerland, to the Cocalico Valley of Lancaster County. The Brickers welcomed five children to the family, including their youngest son, David Bricker (1755-1833), who came to own approximately 70 acres of land on the outskirts of what is now Denver. In 1801, he built a bank barn on his property and a year later, a farmhouse.
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Wine Cellar
Wine Cellar

Welcome to My Wine Cellar

Dwight has always been a beer aficionado. In fact, he's working with a client who wants a beer kitchen in the basement of his home. But, as a result of guests bringing wine to the food fests he hosts in his expansive outdoor kitchen, Dwight has developed an interest in that libation. And, when Dwight takes an interest in something, he goes all out. For example, he loves to cook and his outdoor kitchen is equipped with an array of appliances, grills, and a smoker. Friends know that whenever they travel, their assignment is to bring back a bottle of hot sauce to add to Dwight's collection.
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Wine Cellar
Wine Cellar


The New-Style Summer Kitchen

Cooking in the great outdoors is a tradition that extends back thousands of years - perhaps even a million or more! And, cooking outdoors has always been "a guy thing" - envision cavemen, cowboys, mountain men, natives, boy scouts, and nature lovers preparing their specialties over open fires, then sitting around the dying embers and philosophizing about life.
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Summer Kitchen
Summer Kitchen


From Plain Jane to Plainly Gorgeous

Like many families, this one had outgrown their home. So, they decided to explore their options. With two children in high school, they knew moving outside their school district was out of the question. Luckily, they discovered a large but rather basic house on a semi-wooded lot just minutes from their home.
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Plainly Gorgeous
Plainly Gorgeous


Living It Up...Outdoors

When the Cardinas and their four sons moved into their home in 2000, their goal was to eventually do "something" with their large backyard that, according to Andy, "was nothing but grass." Their inability to decide on a direction- Enlarge the small patio? Build a large deck? - kept their plans on hold for nearly 10 years.
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Outdoors
Outdoors


Going Underground

Dwight’s clients wanted to update the lower level of their 25-year-old home. The basement had been finished to the extent that the block walls were painted and the floor carpeted. A brick wall provided the backdrop for a wood-burning stove. “It was really outdated,” the homeowner says, and with grandchildren expanding the size of the family, they needed a place where everyone could gather.
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Underground Living Space
Underground Living Space


Adapting History

Four years ago, Kerry bought the historic estate that dates to 1739. “It was originally called Bucher Thal, and at one time, it stretched over 400 acres,” he explains. Several generations of Bears lived and worked on the property. In the early 1900s, the Eberly family became its owners. Then, a local doctor bought it, after which a couple from the Midwest who operated an antiques business owned it.
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Transforming the Mill
Transforming the Mill

You Can Go Home Again

Luckily for Kurt, Tracy had fallen in love with the four-over-four house that dates to 1841. She often commented on the house as they made their way from their home in Philadelphia to visit Kurt’s parents, who live just over a mile from the farm that had been established in 1838 (As was often the case, the barn predated the house). Actually, Kurt’s “relationship” to the property extends to both sides of the family, as his maternal great-grandfather worked as a mason on the property.

In 1938, Kurt’s great uncle, Daniel, came to own the property that became commonly known as Fichthorn Farm. While the Fichthorn men were hat makers by trade, horses were their avocation. The farm became home to a racetrack that hosted harness racing on Sunday afternoons. A working blacksmith shop was onsite and the barn was home to a tack room that served as a “clubhouse” (complete with the proverbial pot-bellied stove) that drew horse lovers from around the area. 
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Four-Over-Four Farm House
Four-Over-Four Farm House
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